Guitar Technique

RANDOM GUITAR LICKS – VOLUME II

Here’s another batch of guitar licks from my repertoire for you budding guitar heroes and heroines to chew on.

The first lick is an arpeggio in A minor.

The second lick is an arpeggio in C major.

The third lick is a B Diminished arpeggio.

The fourth lick is a G7 arpeggio. Integrating seventh chord arpeggios into blues runs are great way to make your solos more interesting:

RANDOM GUITAR LICKS – VOLUME I

I’ll be sharing with all of you aspiring guitar gods and goddesses the guitar licks in my repertoire. This is the first volume of licks. See videos below:

This first lick is a diminished arpeggio using hammer-ons and pull offs. I’m repeating the same hammer-on/pull-off pattern every three frets going up the neck.

The second lick is an E minor pentatonic “rolling lick” going down the scale. I got this lick from listening to the late, great Irish rock guitarist Gary Moore, who has been a major influence on my playing.

The third lick is in E minor pentatonic where I’m just hammering on and pulling off the E and B strings in a circular motion. Again, I got this lick from listening to Gary Moore.

The fourth lick is a descending lick in E Aeolian minor. I got this lick from the introductory guitar solo to “End of the World” by Gary Moore from his Corridors of Power album.

LANNERBÄCK’S KITCHEN SINK

The following video is a demonstration of a technical exercise I came up with called “Lannerbäck’s Kitchen Sink”.

In case you’re unaware – “Lannerbäck” is Yngwie Malmsteen’s actual surname before he adopted his mother’s surname of Malmsteen. This exercise includes techniques that Yngwie would typically employ such as alternate picking, economy picking and sweep picking. So I’ve included “everything but the kitchen sink”, get it?

Below the video is tablature in PDF format and a GuitarTux file.

Lannerbäck’s Kitchen Sink – PDF

Lannerbäck’s Kitchen Sink – TuxGuitar file

VIBRATO FOR THE LEAD GUITARIST

The following video is an overview of my vibrato technique, which I developed from listening to blue-based rock guitarists such as Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page and Paul Kossoff (of Free). A more detailed overview of vibrato technique and suggested listening list can be found at this article.